America is a country flanked by the two largest oceans in the world and contained on either side by coastal mountain ranges. In the middle, there’s hundreds of thousands of lakes, rivers and canyons. And, with the introduction of the Interstate Highway System in 1956, Eisenhower’s proposed 41,000 miles of road made it infinitely easier to traverse our expansive country and see all those natural wonders.

By design, the interstate highways were meant to make the idea of traveling across the States more attractive, and also make evacuations from large cities easier, If you find yourself driving cross country on the interstate, make sure you set aside some time to take a detour on one of these hidden asphalt gems before you get to your “Point B.”

Hells Canyon Road, Idaho

Starting just across the river from Coopersfield Campground in Oxbow, Oregon, and continuing all the way to Hells Canyon Dam, the appropriately named Hells Canyon Road runs along the Snake River for 22 miles. Hugging the jagged canon walls, the two-lane strip of black top undulates and creases the entire way. When you do eventually get to the Hells Canyon Dam, only Park Service vehicles are allowed past, so you’ll have to turn around and head back the way you came. Going 44 miles out of your way never looked so good.

Saddle Road, Mauna Kea State Park, Hawaii

Flanked by volcanos Muana Kea and Muana Loa on either side, Saddle Road isn’t short on breathtaking views. The naturally chaotic volcanic formations give way to the perfect canvas of asphalt and a scenic downhill run to the crystal-blue waters of the Pacific.

Route 245-Route 7-Route 26 Loop, Oregon

There’s no doubt Western Oregon is full of great roads. But what really makes these asphalt oases some of the best in the country is that traffic is nonexistent. You’ll go for miles without seeing another car or truck, and if you do happen across a slower-moving vehicle, most of the time they’ll just pull over to get out of the way. They know why you’re there.

See 7 More Hidden Gem Driving Roads HERE